Ayurvedic Yoga | Open


This class is taught by:

Logan Wagenseller

Yoga has opened the door for a lifetime of learning, self-discovery, and an opportunity to do what I love, teach. Committing to daily practice has taught me how to navigate life’s uncharted waters with grace and strength and instilled in me a desire to share that same sense of personal power with others. My yogic journey has encouraged a deeper connection within, and a better understanding of my relationship to what exists around me. It allows me to walk a bit softer in a hard world, and gives me peace in knowing that I am capable of creating the life I desire to live. As an instructor, I strive to always give others the love, positivity, and space to journey closer toward their own Self discovery.

In January 2019, I will graduate from Longwave Yoga’s 300-Hour Advanced Teacher Training, a 2-year program that has provided me more insight and knowledge than I ever imagined possible, and inspires me to deliver yoga with the highest integrity and skill.

Through training and teaching, I hope to instill in students confidence, strength, and self-love in a strong and powerful, yet compassionate and vulnerable way, inspiring those around me to unearth their truest potential and tell their authentic story, always.

Rebecca Warfield

Rebecca received her 200 and 300-hour certification at Longwave Yoga. For many years, Rebecca unintentionally explored yoga by way of ballet and modern dance. After completing a Master’s in English literature and teaching English at the university-level, Rebecca began exploring the expansiveness of yogic studies by way of both physical practice and academic study. Like language and literature, Rebecca found yoga is a vehicle toward one’s personal articulation of what it means to be aware and clear in the world. As a lifelong learner and educator, Rebecca believes that yoga can transform one’s life by recognizing his or her own potential. Rebecca believes there is no one-size-fits-all version of yoga and enjoys witnessing the practice take a personal shape within each person’s life both on and off the mat.
Ayurvedic Yoga - Season/Dosha Descriptions

Ayurveda is known as the science of self-healing and longevity. In the practice of Ayurveda (the sister science of yoga), the Doshas (constitutions) have a yearly cycle, which we experience as the seasons. There are three seasons in the Ayurvedic calendar, which coincide with the conditions of climatic changes. Approximately, in North America, we experience the following cycles:

 


Kapha - Mid-February through May
Pitta - June through September
Vata - October through Mid-February

 

 

More specifically, in the coastal Carolinas, the primary dosha present in the environment is Kapha, and we must always think of keeping the Kapha dosha in balance. In the Longwave Yoga Ayurvedic class you will be guided in a practice appropriate to pacify the predominate seasonal dosha, while always considering which elements are most dominant in the Wilmington, NC area.

 

Vata - October through mid-February

 

Vata is the season which brings rushing air, cool, rough, dry wind, cooling the earth and atmosphere from the fire of Pitta. It is that quality of space that brings in cool, clear, cloudless days of fall. Naturally these changes and qualities in the seasons bring similar changes to our bodies. Vata loves to move and excite, but sometimes that movement can be scattered, which elevates the Vata qualities in the body and mind. When Vata is aggravated, the movement becomes “confused.” We become drier, feel a little spacey, and skin becomes rougher to the touch. If Vata becomes out of balance in our bodies, physiologically we can become dehydrated, our joints have that snap, crackle, and pop effect happen as we begin to move, and emotionally we may feel anxious or forgetful. To pacify, we take slow, steady movement that compresses the colon, large intestine, pelvis, and sacrum. During this time of year, a yoga practice that focuses on calming the nerves and grounding that airy quality can be very beneficial in balancing Vata. The practice may be shorter, but end with a longer, restful savasana so the mind and body have ample time to settle. Poses that are ideal for pacifying Vata dosha are: Bhujangasana, Ustrasana, and Gomukasana.


Upcoming classes:

  • Tue Oct 23 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Logan Wagenseller
  • Fri Oct 26 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Rebecca Warfield
  • Tue Oct 30 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Logan Wagenseller
  • Fri Nov 02 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Rebecca Warfield
  • Tue Nov 06 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Logan Wagenseller
  • Fri Nov 09 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Rebecca Warfield
  • Tue Nov 13 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Logan Wagenseller
  • Fri Nov 16 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Rebecca Warfield
  • Tue Nov 20 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Logan Wagenseller
  • Fri Nov 23 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Rebecca Warfield
  • Tue Nov 27 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Logan Wagenseller
  • Fri Nov 30 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Rebecca Warfield
  • Tue Dec 04 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Logan Wagenseller
  • Fri Dec 07 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Rebecca Warfield
  • Tue Dec 11 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Logan Wagenseller
  • Fri Dec 14 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Rebecca Warfield
  • Tue Dec 18 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Logan Wagenseller
  • Fri Dec 21 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Rebecca Warfield
  • Tue Dec 25 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Logan Wagenseller
  • Fri Dec 28 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm with Rebecca Warfield