Moksha - Liberation Through Yoga



As we prepare to celebrate our country’s Independence on July 4th, it has many of us here at the studio pondering the ideas of Liberty & Freedom. In yoga we talk of freedom as Moksha, the Sanskrit word for liberation, or to be set free. (synonymous with 'mukti'.)

What does this mean?

A powerfully spiritual book of wisdom, The Bhagavad Gita states, "One whose happiness is within, who is active and rejoices within, and whose aim is inward is actually the perfect mystic. He is liberated..." A truly liberated person relies not on external circumstances, but instead remembers the freedom and joy that has been inside of them all along. In essence, freedom is found in the “letting go” and just being.

When we talk about freedom, we usually think of freedom from something...

Through ideas such as Samsara (the cycle of birth and death) and Karma (bound by unfinished business), we have been conditioned to believe that we are not already free. But truly, freedom is a state of being. It is an experience, a feeling not confined or determined by time. We witness this time and time again through yoga, through the ebb and flow of life.

Stepping on to our mats, we honor our freedom...

By moving our bodies and breathing in our own unique ways. We can experience liberation through playful movement and staying present. No matter where our yoga takes us, whether on the beach or on our boards, we can offer our body, our heart and our mind to embody freedom. Get out there and experience something new – cultivate and express your childlike playfulness, knowing that it will look completely different day to day, moment to moment.

Michael Singer’s The Untethered Soul captures the essence of liberation perfectly by saying, “The soul is infinite. It is free to expand everywhere. It is free to experience all of life.” What does freedom mean to you? What does it feel like, what does it look like, taste like? How do you express your freedom?

Loka Samasta Sukhino Bhavantu

“May all beings everywhere be happy and free and may the thoughts, words, and actions of my own life contribute in some way to that happiness and to that freedom for all.”

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