Do You Believe in Magic?



Is life feeling vibrant and alive with magic?! We hope you can feel what we are feeling! The past three years together at Longwave Yoga have been pure magic. We couldn’t be more thankful for you who makes the studio so authentic and special everyday, and we look forward to celebrating with you all month long.

We aren’t the only ones feeling magically alive. Yogis for thousands of years have harnessed and witnessed the magical powers of yoga. The magic of yoga is not a fun house of mirrors where you only hit dead-ends with yourself in the way. The magic of yoga reflects the image of infinite possibility and all beings. When we let yoga’s magic do its work, we broaden our horizons of perception, seeing ourselves as One with all.

When we think of magic, we often conjure concepts of illusion: disappearing acts, pulling rabbits out of hats. These tricks of the eye will often lead to a deep desire to understand how something so inexplicable could happen. However, in yoga, magic lies in diving into the depths of the inexplicable to lift the veil of illusion. Unlike popular notions of magic, the study and practice of yoga asks us to dissolve the walls of maya or illusion. Rather than disappearing acts or tricks that cause us to cling to what we perceive as real--such as our bodies that separate us from others--our yoga practice dissolves the boundaries of individuality and merges the singular into the Whole. 

Krishna explains to Arjuna in the Bhagavad Gita, that magic is freedom found within Oneness: “When he sees that the myriad of beings/ emanate from the One/ and have their source in the One,/ that man gains absolute freedom.” In other words, all beings are made of the same seed, the same matter of creation. Our individual lives are single cells that make up the entirety of existence. And when we come to that realization, we are freed from our own illusions.

Often, however, our lives, experiences, and misknowings stand in the way of seeing Oneness. The ahamkara or ego develops the illusion that we are separate beings in an effort to explain a vast and limitless reality. Our yoga practice asks us to work our magic—to yoke mind, body, and spirit—in the effort to understand Oneness. The mindfulness and union we create within ourselves on our yoga mats keeps us from avidya or falling into our own illusions, dissolving barriers within ourselves such as anger, jealousy, and fear. We become deeply present in the moment and keenly aware that this experience of life is far greater than the illusion of division. Instead, when the illusion is dismantled, we see that our lives are not separate from another’s.

When we embrace this Oneness within ourselves, the real magic begins. The magic moves beyond the Self as a way to connect with others. The experience of others that seemed far removed from your life become personal. Krishna later explains in the Bhagavad Gita, “When he sees all beings as equal/ in suffering or in joy/ because they are like himself,/ that man has grown perfect in yoga." This is the magic of advocacy, of human rights, of environmental awareness—seeing the joy, suffering, successes, and failures of others as part of your own experience. In turn, this dissolves the barriers of separation and allows us to merge and unite with the Whole of existence. We see ourselves a part of the global experience of life. That we are in this magical world together.

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